ICMScE 2018 International Conference On Mathematics And Science Education

The Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) Program funds innovative pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12) science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and Informal Science Education (ISE) educational projects. Taronga’s aim is to inspire and educate the next generation of conservation scientists. The Taronga Institute will support the essential need for contextual authentic STEM learning and, together with the wider Zoo sites, will provide authentic, interactive learning opportunities in an environment of working science. The co-location of teaching facilities and research labs will create tangible links between theory and practice.

The two-year Master in Educational Sciences aims to prepare students for academic and professional interventions in the field of educational innovation. It prepares students for research into the nature, development and features of educational actors, institutions, related policies, and processes in educational development and educational practices.

The goal of the R25 Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program is support pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12) and informal science education activities that: (1) enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs, and (2) foster a better understanding of NIH-funded biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its public health implications.

A number of our graduates have taken up appointments in teaching- related areas or areas outside teaching, including the IT software industry, industrial training, specialist science-based sales sectors and environmental science. Graduates of this programme have also undertaken further study leading to postgraduate qualifications at Graduate Diploma, Masters and PhD levels.

Before one can discuss the teaching and learning of science, consensus is needed about what science is and why it should occupy a place in the K-8 curriculum. One must ask: What is science”? and Why teach it”? A consensus answer to these fundamental questions is not easily attained, because science is characterized in different ways not only by different categories of people interested in it—practitioners, philosophers, historians, educators—but also by people within each of these broad categories. In this chapter, we describe some different characterizations of science and consider implications for what is taught in science classrooms. Although the characterizations share many common features, they vary in the emphasis and priority they place on different aspects of scientific activity, with potential consequences for what is emphasized in science classrooms. We then describe the goals of science education associated with each perspective.